LA IS STILL TRYING TO KILL ME     

  

  	
       
      
         
          
             
                  
             
          

          

         
      
       
    

  


        Think Tank Gallery and Vans present  Drinkin’ Smokin’ & West Coastin’ – A Group Love/Hate Letter to LA -  a month of art and events about their hometown, and all the stereotypes that come from it – especially the true ones. It's a reflection on classic Best Coast culture from the '84 Olympics to the Kings/Lakers rivalry, the period when they grew up with their city, and all the great and terrible things that happened in between.   Opening is August 19th, 7:30pm - 1:00am and until September 23rd.   Explore the link below for the daily events happing during the exhibition:   https://drinkinsmokinwestcoastin.com/   Join us for the blowout opening night event of our next monthlong series of art and events, this time exploring something we all know a bit about: the City of Angels. Opening night will be full of entertainment, including a Diner serving up chicken and beer from Roscoe's and Lagunitas, live "guitar paintings" by Ash Santos, performance pieces by Alex LeGolvan and others, gifting from sponsors like Nomadica Wine and ShowGrow, limited edition product launches by Vans and Valley Cruise Press, and a preview of installations such as  LA Is Still Trying To Kill Me .  This show is about three things: Drinkin,' Smokin,' and West Coastin.' The smokin' aspect will be hosted by none other than the visionary dispensary and immersive 420 entertainment brand ShowGrow. A decked out video lounge in the back will provide gifting suites, experiential cannabis events, supper clubs, and a generally chill area to hang out and watch nostalgic content while bathed in purple light.  When we were tasked with experience designing a show around oldschool LA stereotypes, the most played out was the traffic joke.So we dove in headfirst and built a bar based on LA transportation. The eye test is the Lagunitas beer menu, the photobooth is a 1992 CA Driver's License (no smiling allowed), and there are ride sharing ads all over the place so you don't drink and drive. El Silencio mezcal and Mixwell are providing the cocktails, and Nomadica is filling out the wine shelves.   

Think Tank Gallery and Vans present Drinkin’ Smokin’ & West Coastin’ – A Group Love/Hate Letter to LA - a month of art and events about their hometown, and all the stereotypes that come from it – especially the true ones. It's a reflection on classic Best Coast culture from the '84 Olympics to the Kings/Lakers rivalry, the period when they grew up with their city, and all the great and terrible things that happened in between. 
Opening is August 19th, 7:30pm - 1:00am and until September 23rd.

Explore the link below for the daily events happing during the exhibition:

https://drinkinsmokinwestcoastin.com/

 TRASH PEOPLE 

TRASH PEOPLE is a solo exhibition by Erica Luedtke at Eastern Projects Annex Gallery. The exhibition runs from Friday, May 12th to Saturday, June 24th, 2017. The opening reception takes place on Friday, May 12th, 2017 from 6pm to 10pm. This event is free and open to the public. 

This exhibition is a collection of new work from Luedtke that is representative of the progress that happens through intense struggle. With the use of found, industrial materials in conjunction with bright colors at a large scale, value is given to things that are typically looked at as unimportant. This work is sad, lonely, and stressful. However, it is also cheerful, bright, and hard to ignore.

REVIEW: KRISTEN PHIPPS AND ERICA LUEDTKE'S "PHOSPHOR-OBSCURA"

Review by Editor Kayla Goggin with Savannah Art Informer

Review by Editor Kayla Goggin with Savannah Art Informer

“Phosphor,” Erica Luedtke explains, “is a material that is luminescent without being heated. It’s a color with light inside of it which creates an environment.”

Stepping inside Phosphor-Obscura, the new exhibition by Luedtke and Kristen Phipps opening at the Welmont Gallery on Friday, May 20, is like stepping inside an artist’s memory of color.

If it were possible, I’d tell you that this show should be viewed alone in the dark, with just the artworks and their refracted light floating in front of you like some stained glass fever dream, too vibrant to be natural yet too organic to have been manufactured.

I’d tell you to leave and not open your eyes again for an hour so you can watch the glow of those colors slip off their own edges into the static river of memory where they fracture and blend to match the marbled forms in Phipps’ paintings.

You won’t be able to see the works like that on Friday night during the opening reception (5 – 9pm), but they’ll still leave an indelible impression. As with any show in which the work’s chief concern is with form, the feeling you leave with is the whole point.

Rarely are exhibitions so well-suited to a specific gallery space. Luedtke has made great use of the Welmont’s industrial move-able walls to carve out a niche for what is without a doubt the show’s centerpiece, an installation titled “Untitled (Blue Light)”. The piece immediately invokes James Turrell and Robert Irwin (influences which Luedtke is refreshingly forthright about), its cool blue light diffused with a piece of scrim to glow with a brightness that is at once jarring and soothing.

Either by design or by luck, the hanging walls do great favors for Phipps and Luedtke – the blue light of the installation spills out onto the floor of the gallery, setting off the works hanging above and around. This light activates the gallery floor and (combined with the yellow and magenta reflections from Luedtke’s other works) turns it into a glassy sea of reflected light.

The shapes we find there are mimicked in Phipps’ marbled, rhythmic panels. Inspired by imagery pulled from experiments with pin hole cameras, Polaroids, and camera obscuras, Phipps’ paintings become maelstroms of color.

“It’s all different places forming one thought,” she tells me. Each painting is a pastiche of countless memories collected into one, a portrait of the period at the end of a neuron’s sentence.

Paired with Luedtke’s Richter-style squeegee forms on Tyvek (which are all new by the way – the most recent of which was completed this Wednesday evening), they seem to tell a cohesive story about the way light and, by extension, color are experienced; how they become the glue that seals memories together.

Phosphor-Obscura is perhaps one of the best painting shows this season. 

Phosphor-Obscura is an exhibition of work from Kristen Phipps and Erica Luedtke that relates ideas such as time and color vibrancy with visual depth and familiarity. Phipps’ work integrates camera obscura techniques to explore the darker undertones of deterioration and projection.  Memories become about past and future; a chromatic wasteland of uncertainty. Luedtke's work explores the formal qualities of paint and color luminosity while questioning the relationship between the figure and ground. This exhibition encourages viewers to contemplate themes such as life and death, and to be open to transformation.

PHOTO BY: KALIKA SARASIN ARTICLE BY: EMILIE KEFALAS

PHOTO BY: KALIKA SARASIN

ARTICLE BY: EMILIE KEFALAS

ARTIST DELVE INTO THE ABSTRACT WITH PHOSPHOR-OBSCURA

Looking at Kristen Phipps’s artwork is not unlike staring into a daydream. The same can be said for Erica Luedtke’s pieces.  The combined effects of their visual undertakings will be on display during their joint exhibition. The showcase, Phosphor-Obscura, will take place on Friday, May 20 at Welmont on Montgomery Street.  

The two senior SCAD painting majors have been planning their senior exhibit since the middle of winter quarter after deciding to collaborate their individual painting personas to create an unconventional and optical exposition.  

“We were trying to bring both of our work together and we actually struggled with a title for a long time,” Phipps said.  “But the ‘obscura’ is my half because I deal a lot with photo obscure techniques and pinhole photography.”

“And ‘phosphor’ relates to my work, because it involves the color luminosity,” Luedtke added.

Elements of the human brain and the natural world inspired both Luedtke and Phipps’s unique techniques used in creating the artwork of Phosphor-Obscura.  

“We wanted to bridge two things that normally wouldn’t be together with color,” Phipps said.  “We both have the common desire to interpret energy around us that we can’t see.”

For Phipps, the creative process began with internal examination and then discovery.    

“Over the last year I wanted to get away from a lot of the control behind my own thoughts,” Phipps said.  “I stumbled upon pinhole photography, knowing nothing about it, and started playing with the unpredictability.  From there I’m bringing these things and places together, from the last year and a half.  I’m playing a visual telephone game with myself.”

Luedtke works on a larger scale compared to Phipps, allowing for her to physically interact and involve herself with her work as it develops throughout her process.